Educational Articles

Emergency Situations

  • Feline idiopathic cystitis includes a set of clinical signs associated with abnormal urination and is an exclusionary diagnosis. Cats will often suffer waxing and waning of clinical signs such as straining to urinate, blood in urine, and inappropriate urination. Many conditions must be ruled out before a diagnosis of FIC can be made. Treatment involves addressing the stressors that triggered the clinical signs in the first place and improving the cat's environment to reduce or eliminate potential stressors. Pain medications are used to relieve your cat’s discomfort, as well as diet changes to improve clinical signs and reduce the frequency of occurrence.

  • There are several common diseases or conditions that may affect the pet ferret. Like dogs, ferrets may get heartworms, distemper virus, heat stroke and a variety of cancerous conditions. Yearly veterinary health examinations are recommended to assess the presence or absence of any of the diseases listed above.

  • Usually caused by a bite from another cat, fight wound infections can lead to the development of an abscess (a pocket of pus) or cellulitis (pain and swelling in the area of the bite). A cat’s sharp canine teeth can easily puncture the skin of another cat, leaving small, deep, wounds that seal over quickly, so it is important that your cat is seen by a veterinarian for treatment as soon as possible after being bitten.

  • The sight of blood is frightening for many people, especially when an injured cat is bleeding. With quick first aid, the situation is not as scary. An injured pet is scared and in pain so be sure to take precautions to avoid being bitten. You may need to use a muzzle or have someone restrain your cat while you provide first aid. Keeping wounds covered with pressure to slow the bleeding is the first step. Minor injuries may be manageable at home, but larger wounds and internal wounds require immediate veterinary care.

  • The sight of blood is frightening for many people, especially when an injured dog is bleeding. With quick first aid, the situation is not as scary. An injured pet is scared and in pain so be sure to take precautions to avoid being bitten. You may need to use a muzzle or have someone restrain your dog while you provide first aid. Keeping wounds covered with pressure to slow the bleeding is the first step. Minor injuries may be manageable at home, but larger wounds and internal bleeding require immediate veterinary care.

  • Broken nails are acute painful injuries that require first aid, and in some cases, a veterinary visit. Nails are made up of a collection of blood vessels and nerves covered by a hard protective layer of keratin. Bleeding should initially be controlled with pressure from gauze or a towel, followed by cauterizing powder if needed. Any remaining damaged part needs to be removed which usually requires veterinary care. Depending on the level of the break, your cat may need to be sedated and/or the area numbed with a nerve block prior to trimming the nail above the break. Depending on the severity, a bandage may be placed to protect the injury. Antibiotics and pain medications may be prescribed if indicated. Broken nails are best prevented by keeping all nails short through regular trimmings.

  • Broken nails are acute painful injuries that require first aid, and in some cases, a veterinary visit. Nails are made up of a collection of blood vessels and nerves covered by a hard protective layer of keratin. Bleeding should initially be controlled with pressure from gauze or a towel, followed by cauterizing powder if needed. Any remaining damaged part needs to be removed which usually requires veterinary care. Depending on the level of the break, your dog may need to be sedated and/or the area numbed with a nerve block prior to trimming the nail above the break. Depending on the severity, a bandage may be placed to protect the injury. Antibiotics and pain medications may be prescribed if indicated. Broken nails are best prevented by keeping all nails short through regular trimmings.

  • Medical emergencies occur suddenly and without warning. It is important for all cat owners to have a basic understanding of common veterinary medical emergencies and basic first aid for their pets. This handout provides guidelines you can follow in the event that your cat is experiencing shock and/or requires rescue breathing or CPR. In any emergency situation with your pet, contact your veterinarian or closest emergency facility immediately.

  • Medical emergencies occur suddenly and without warning. It is important for all dog owners to have a basic understanding of common veterinary medical emergencies and basic first aid for their pets. This handout provides guidelines you can follow in the event that your dog is experiencing shock and/or requires rescue breathing or CPR. In any emergency situation with your pet, contact your veterinarian or closest emergency facility immediately.

  • While most of the time cats will land on their feet, they can still sustain serious injuries after a fall, including sprains, broken bones, head trauma, and chest or abdominal injuries. If you see your cat fall, monitor her for at least 3-5 days for anything abnormal that may develop. Serious injuries need to be evaluated immediately by your veterinarian, but there are steps you can take at home to prepare your pet to be transported to your veterinary hospital.